Faces of Vietnam. Part 2.

It’s the people.

And of the people it’s the children that so stick in my memory from my brief trip to Vietnam. I remember them being inquisitive yet holding a respectful distance; bright-eyed and quick to wave whilst staying close to mum.¬†They also loved to chime out

“Hello…”

in English accompanied by a cheeky chorus of giggles.

Smiling and happy.

Smiling and happy.

Gracious people.

Suffice to say I won’t be talking about ‘the War’ here. Many who fought there all those years ago now may understandably have a different opinion than me. But I can only ‘report’ what I observed and experienced from my first Vietnam trip.

And that’s what I do whenever and where ever I travel.

I travel to learn and observe to understand.

I saw and met warm, gracious, patient and contented people.

Unrushed and patient.

Unrushed and patient.

Non-hurried and often, it seemed, without many possessions I observed families laughing, working and playing together. Outside of the cities it seems very much a paddock to plate subsistence society which is actually still the norm for most of the world’s population.

Thank god for digital photography is all I can say. I took so many photographs. Many more than I normally do. The reason?

The reason being that instead of scowls or ‘look aways’ upon being noticed with my bulky Canon DSLR – common with street photography in western cities – I was welcomed with a beaming smile more often than not. And how can a photographer refuse an invitation like that.

Face of Vietnam. Part 2. Gallery. [click an image to enlarge]

Previous Post.

Faces of Vietnam. Part 1.

About Saxon

I'm passionate about travelling, music, photography, blogging, 'Social Anthropology' (the posh term for people-watching) and creating content. I travel to learn and observe to understand. My dream day would look something like this.... A bottle of red (or two), fresh baguette (or two) & wedge of Camembert (or two), a balmy Paris September eve spent people-watching in fine company on the banks of the Canal St Martin.

There are 12 comments

  1. RUMI

    I love that you have a post dedicated to faces – it seems like a quick, genuine way to give us a glimpse of Vietnam. I’m especially in love with what you wrote about the children in the previous post – I felt the same way about the children I saw in Afghanistan – they’re curious, sometimes gleeful and love nothing more than seeing the photos you’ve taken of them.

    Liked by 1 person

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